Read Emma's Q & A on our new bedding range

22nd September 2014

Read Emma's Q & A on our new bedding range

Why did you decide to create a range of bedlinen?
Because it’s so much fun to see our patterns in a new dimension. In this case, they’re re-interpreted in dreamy, restful colours and on a different scale - there’s a genuine excitement in seeing a pattern you’ve envisaged as a mug, or a serving plate, rolled out on the enormous scale of a double duvet. You see the patterns in a new light, and there’s a real thrill in seeing what a very, very nice bedroom they might make.
For me, it's all about cosiness when it comes to bed linen. I love to make a really irresistible- looking bedroom, with a bed you can't wait to snuggle down into. I always start with plain white sheets, and then I love to play around. I’ll make up a child's bed with new sheets as a surprise for when they come home, or I might use patterned bedlinen to suit a particular friend when they come to stay. I also like mixing patterned pillowcases with plain sheets, and layering on different cushions and quilts to make a bed look really cosy. In fact it's a direct translation of my convictions about kitchens - a mix of patterns, easy and relaxed, that just makes it feel like home.
Can you tell us about the patterns in the range?
Black Toast is a decorative typographic design, with another of Matthew's hand-drawn Toast messages proclaiming simply Love & Kisses, and a lovely heart pattern on the reverse. Rose & Bee uses the deliciously nostalgic Rose and Bee pattern, with its pretty pink roses and pale blue Persian border, made up in panels – which is something I do when I make quilts for the beds at home. Garden Flowers is a calm and pretty floral in dreamy palest blue, inspired by Staffordshire pottery patterns of the nineteenth century, and Dresser is the most dramatic pattern – it shows a bold and irresistible display of favourite everyday china, including many familiar Emma Bridgewater patterns, in a subtle colour combination of putty-pink and pale grey.
Then there are two patterns for kids. Dancing Mice gives a closer look at some well- established favourites in the Emma Bridgewater range – sweet mice who have raided the dressing up box and thrown a dancing party. And Men at Work is perfect for children, so they can go to sleep planning enormous exciting projects for the sandpit. Our black Labrador is shown driving some of the trucks – but that kind of thing can happen in dreams!
How did you choose the patterns?
The range is produced by the home furnishings company Ashley Wilde, whose expertise I absolutely trust, so it was a collaborative conversation – but I was hugely pleased with the patterns they chose. They’re some of my very favourite designs.
Where does the inspiration for your designs come from?
The inspiration for my patterns comes from my life – it might be Matthew’s amazing gardening, or a book I’ve read, or a family holiday, but it’s always something very personal. One of the things I’m passionate about is the manufacturing heritage in Stoke-on-Trent, which is the home of British pottery, and where all ours is made. It was reading about the history of pottery making there that gave me the idea for Garden Flowers – it’s inspired by the printed patterns that were first used in the 19th century, and made patterned pottery widely affordable and hugely popular.
Which is your favourite from the range?
It has to be Dresser, which is inspired by my kitchen dresser at home. Filled with my own pottery, and pieces once owned by my mum or my granny, combined with family treasures like a silver pig and a Staffordshire greyhound, it’s the heart of my kitchen, and one of my favourite things – I’m probably more aware of what’s on there than I am of what’s in my wardrobe. So that pattern’s very close to home for me, and I was especially thrilled when Ashley Wilde chose it. It was a very bold choice for bed linen, but in the soft colours they’ve chosen, it works beautifully.
What’s your secret for a good night’s sleep?
A good reading light and a great book.

22nd September 2014